Winter Trip 2010: Post #1

I am currently sitting on a couch in an apartment in Jerusalem!  It’s been two years since I could say that.  I am very happy to be back.

I just got into Israel this afternoon (it is about 10:30 p.m. now.  Below is a basic outline of what’s happened so far:

  • I got to the St. Louis airport, later than planned of course, around 12:00 p.m. Monday.  I avoided the full body scanner and went through a metal detector while a Catholic Priest was being frisked in the line next to me.
  • I got into Philadelphia a bit early and did some last minute emails and phone calls.  In the middle of it, everyone in the gate area for the upcoming Israel flight was asked to leave so security could get it ready for the flight.  When I went back, they had put up a seperate wall.  We all had to go through a second line of bag screening and metal detectors to go to Israel.
  • My flight to Israel was long, but quite nice.  I sat by some interesting people, slept a bit, read, and watched two movies.  I was able to get Kosher meals, even though I had not requested them in advance.
  • I went through passport control, retrieved my bags from baggage claim, and tried to rent a cell phone.  Apparently you can no longer rent cell phones in Ben-Gurion Airport.  I wish I had known about that change in advance.
  • I took the train from the airport to Tel-Aviv Haganah train station.  In the station I tried to rent a phone, no luck.
  • I walked to the Tel-Aviv bus station down the street to catch a bus to Jerusalem.  I also tried to rent a phone there.  With no luck again, I bought a go phone.
  • I experienced the Tel-Aviv/Jerusalem evening traffic.
  • I went through the bus station in Jerusalem and got a bus to French Hill.  The bus was very busy.
  • In French Hill, I met the family I am spending the night with, had dinner, walked the dog, etc.

Tomorrow I plan to go to the newly renovated Israel Museum and who knows what else.  In the evening, I go to a wedding outside of Jerusalem and it is also the first night of Chanukah.  I’m excited!

Hopefully, I will be able to solidify more plans tomorrow.  I don’t know how often (or detailed) I will be writing, but there should be an update here in a few days or this weekend at the latest.

Advertisements

No New Posts

It has been an incredibly long time since my last post.  With the end of the quarter, multiple work projects, the job search, planning my trip to Israel and England, finals, etc, it is easy to understand why.  Perhaps that will be changing before too long.

Sarah Palin’s Latest Hit On Michelle Obama

Read this article.  While it is from the Huffington Post, with that site’s obvious political position, it is hard to argue with what the author concludes, even if his quotes are taken out of context.  Sarah Palin has a track record in this area already.

My conclusion: Seriously, Sarah Palin? I think you are the one who needs to get a better understand of “We, The People.”

Sarah Palin Slams Michelle Obama in Racially Charged Passage From New Book

Geoffrey Dunn

In passages leaked from her forthcoming book America by Heart, Sarah Palin — the erstwhile quitter governor of Alaska, who now, by all indications, fancies herself as President of the United States — has taken another cheap shot at First Lady Michelle Obama.

In a passage on perceptions of racial inequality in the United States, Palin slams President Barack Obama, who, she asserts, “seems to believe” that “America — at least America as it currently exists — is a fundamentally unjust and unequal country.”

And then she goes after Michelle Obama:

Certainly his wife expressed this view when she said during the 2008 campaign that she had never felt proud of her country until her husband started winning elections. In retrospect, I guess this shouldn’t surprise us, since both of them spent almost two decades in the pews of the Reverend Jeremiah Wright’s church listening to his rants against America and white people.

The passage — coming on page 26 in a chapter entitled “We, the People” — echoes remarks made by Palin on the eve of the midterm elections, at a rally in San Jose, California, at which point she mocked remarks made by Michelle Obama during the 2008 campaign: “You know, when I hear people say, or had said during the campaign that they’ve never been proud of America,” Palin spat out. “Haven’t they met anybody in uniform yet? I get tears in my eyes when I see that young man, that young woman, walking through the airport in uniform…you too… so proud to be American.”

In fact, Michelle Obama’s remarks were made (in Madison, Wisconsin, during the 2008 campaign) in a context of Americans being “unified around some basic common issues”:

What we have learned over this year is that hope is making a comeback. It is making a comeback. And let me tell you something–for the first time in my adult lifetime, I am really proud of my country. And not just because Barack has done well, but because I think people are hungry for change. And I have been desperate to see our country moving in that direction, and just not feeling so alone in my frustration and disappointment. I’ve seen people who are hungry to be unified around some basic common issues, and it’s made me proud.

Afterwards, the First Lady further clarified her remarks by noting that she was referencing the “record number” of young voters participating in the political process in the 2008 campaign:

For the first time in my lifetime, I am seeing people rolling up their sleeves in way that I haven’t seen and really trying to figure this out, and that’s the source of pride I was talking about.

The passages from Palin’s latest book first appeared at Palingates, where several other pages from American by Heart have also been posted. Palin followed up her comments about Michelle Obama by throwing an elbow at U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, also focusing on racial overtones:

It also makes sense, then, that the man President Obama made his attorney general, Eric Holder, would call us a “nation of cowards” for failing to come to grips with what he described as the persistence of racism.

Undergraduate Commencement Address

I was doing some job searching online today and inadvertently came across the text of the speech given at my Undergraduate Commencement by Denver Health CEO Patricia Gabow:

Graduates, parents, and faculty thank you for the honor of sharing in your joy today. After four years in a classroom I know the last the thing the graduates need is another lecture—but mine is short- only 200 power points and just a take home test! In fact, my goal is to be short and hopefully sweet- sharing with you only three tidbits of wisdom from a great philosopher—Fiori Colonna. I am sure none of you-even the philosophy professors -ever heard of him but his insights were profound. These insights came not in long dense sentences that, in my expert medical opinion, can trigger a coma, but in short, crisp sayings. This great philosopher was my grandfather.

My grandfather was born in 1889 in southern Italy – a mountainous region crushed by poverty. As did many Europeans in the early 1900’s, at sixteen he booked steerage passage from the tough docks of Naples to the United States. Like other immigrants, then and now, he was expecting to find streets lined with gold. America, the land of opportunity, did not make success quite that easy. My grandfather used the one gift he had extraordinary musical talent and started his American journey playing in a circus band. I will get back to this concept of a gift in a moment. Even as a non-English
speaking adolescent he knew America could offer more. He studied to obtain a teaching certificate and spent the rest of his life as a public school music teacher. And from this comes the first saying. I can still hear my grandfather’s words—”My girl, if you get an education in America, there is nothing you can’t do.”

Today 1232 of you receive not just a college degree but also see the culmination of a world class education. Now you must take my grandfather’s words to heart and remember there is nothing you cannot do. Given the economic times and the challenges America faces here and around the world, you may doubt this as a reality, but even now it remains true -your education will open many doors – doors to traditional careers like teaching and medicine and doors to new technologies and industries- but like my grandfather- you must find the door and walk through it. Doors will not come to you- just like streets are not paved with gold. This saying has been true for me – my education and my willingness to push open some partly closed doors enabled me to break the glass ceiling and become CEO of a model health care system. So use your education as the path to your door.

While education creates exciting spaces for you to enter—it also creates responsibility. Here at DU you learned to think critically- you must bring this skill into our society. In this time of absurd partisan sound bites and unfounded blogs- we need informed citizenry to preserve this land of opportunity . You must be knowledgeable and you must vote. My grandfather, my parents, my husband and I, and my children never missed voting. Yet in a recent mid cycle election more people voted in American idol than the election—do not be one of these so called citizens.

Let me return to my grandfather. He had such an influence on me because I lived with him. My father was killed in world war II and my mother lived for more than a decade with my grandparents. For me the tragedy became a blessing of knowing my extended family. Which brings me to my grandfather’s second saying – Again I can hear his words—“My girl, not everything bad happens to harm you.” Everyone of you have had or will have something bad happen. My grandfather knew that good things can emanate from what at the time may seem very bad. Many cultures see this truth. In fact, you can Google “what is good” and find this story:

A farmer has a prize stallion; thieves steal the stallion. His neighbor tells him what bad
luck but the man replies “Who knows what is good and what is bad.“ A few days later the
stallion escapes and joins a herd of wild mares bringing them back to the farmer. The
neighbor comes to rejoice with the farmer, but the man repeats “Who knows what is good
and what is bad.” The next day the farmer’s son breaks his leg breaking a wild mare. The
neighbor brings condolences to the farmer who repeats his saying. The following week
the army comes to the village to conscript soldiers but passes over the farmer’s injured
son—and the neighbor says to himself in fact “Who does know what is good and what is
bad.”

Forty years ago on a ski trip in Aspen –I jumped off a diving board wearing a very small pink bikini and landed on another swimmer—sounds pretty bad—but that swimmer asked me out, later proposed and we’ve been married ever since— so who knows what is good or bad.

The final reflection relates to the concept of a gift. Perhaps, my grandfather’s favorite saying was, “If you have a gift and you don’t use it no confessor on earth can absolve you.”

Let’s deconstruct this For most Americans the concept of sin—of voluntarily doing wrong –is not something we think of – hence we don’t think of the need for confessors to relieve of us of the burden of wrongdoing. Even without the concepts of sin and absolution, we all know that there are times that we make bad decisions which negatively impact us and others—My grandfather’s point was that the most unforgiveable act you can do to yourself and to all those around you is to squander your talents. When each of you choose your majors you were thinking about your talents and now you must hone that decision into a career, a commitment, and a journey which will produce good for you, for your family, for the country and the world.

In closing, regardless of your ancestry, you have grandmothers and grandfathers, parents, uncles and aunts who possess the wisdom derived from your culture which is captured in their old sayings—learn these, use them in times of celebration, turn to them in times of sadness—let the old wisdom be a lens to see this new world – to show you the way forward through life. Value your education, see opportunity in both the good and the bad, and find your path and walk it with fortitude and joy and by doing this make your country and this world a better place because you were in it—Congratulations to all of you and to your families.

Quote #21 – Survival

I came across this quote while distracting myself from finals work on Facebook:

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.”
-Charles Darwin

While most people think Darwin implied that the stronger survive, it is in fact those who are unable to adapt, who are stuck on the status quo who will fail to continue into perpetuity.  Thus, we can conclude that survival is based on progression – the idea that we need to adapt and change our ways.  This has a lot of repercussions on how we interact with and accept other people – and in the business sense, the necessity of adapting to the market and consumer demand (or creating new demand) to increase profits and sustainability.  Some may disagree with this analysis, but then I guess we shall see who was right when it comes down to our survival.

Winnie the Pooh!

A new Winnie the Pooh movie comes out Summer 2011!  I am a huge fan, so naturally I am very excited.

Personal Leadership Reflection/Vision Paper

Below is a paper I recently wrote for my Essence of Enterprise class.  I was pleased with the reflection that it caused me to do, as well as with the feedback I received.  I figured I would share, in case anyone is interested.

Personal Leadership Reflection/Vision Paper

In first grade I joined an organization that would influence and shape me in every facet of my life.  At that time I had no idea that that Boy Scouts of America would become my education, serve as my passion, and form one of my largest social circles.  I progressed through the ranks, serving as every major youth leadership position, earning leadership, rank, and religious awards, and even developed a youth leadership course for the University of Scouting.  I got involved with Scouting’s national honor society, the Order of the Arrow, and worked for five years on our council’s summer camp staff.  When I received the Order’s Vigil Honor (highest national honor) in April 2006, I spent the night in the woods, alone, keeping a fire going while challenging myself to reflect on who I am and who I want to become.  Throughout all of this, one quote by the founder of the Order of the Arrow, Dr. E. Urner Goodman, stands above all other lessons and has influenced how I act, how I learn, and how I interact with others every day: “Things of the spirit are what count: brotherhood – in a day when there is too much hatred at home and abroad; cheerfulness – in a day when the pessimists have the floor and cynics are popular; service – in a day when millions are interested in getting or grasping, rather that giving” (Order of the Arrow).

I would not be where I am today without the help of countless individuals.  Whenever I see someone in a leadership position, I try to learn from him or her.  Whether the example is positive or negative, there are lessons I can learn and apply (or not apply) to my own leadership style.  Peter Senge writes in his description of the “Shifting the Burden to the Intervener” system that in some cases, it is most effective to “teach people to fish, rather than giving them fish” (Senge).  I have had mentors throughout my life who have taught me how to fish.  When I was getting involved in planning large scale events for the Boy Scouts, I met someone two years older than me and began following his path and having conversations with him about how best to interact with people who would “know what’s best” for me to do, how to lead younger Scouts, and the best ways to give instruction to volunteers who were sometimes five times my age.  I ended up taking what I learned from him and built the largest district camporee in recent history.  I subsequently worked for him at Boy Scout camp.  He now works for IBM as a Business Transformation Consultant and we have had regular conversations about how I might pursue a career in the consulting field.

Throughout high school and middle school, I was part of my synagogue’s youth group.  Most of those years were spent on the board trying to rebuild our membership base and develop creative programming.  I started getting involved in this thing called “social action.”  Our youth group regularly raised money for food pantries, supported assisted living homes, and volunteered at a youth shelter.  This was all inspired by the Jewish notion of tikun olam or “repairing the world.”  Judaism teaches that the world is not perfect so each person must work to change that reality.  Social justice has informed my volunteer and work involvement with the Boy Scouts of America, Hillel, and the Center for Multicultural Excellence.  As well, when looking for an internship this past summer, I very seriously sought out companies that understood corporate social responsibility.  Build-A-Bear Workshop certainly has that understanding.

Personal values inform professional values.  The two are truly inseparable. Our Oxford team discussed this in length when discussing Benjamin Friedman’s quote that “Economic growth not only relies upon moral impetus, it has moral consequences” (Friedman).  In order to be truly successful, one must be happy.  For me, happiness is gained through helping others.  Whether through social justice activities or personal connections, I am constantly striving to improve the world around me.  In my short lifetime, some of the best/worst examples of corporate greed have occurred.  Rather than devoting one’s life to making money for one’s self, one could make a difference in both the corporate and civil spheres.  Through such actions, it is possible to be recognized monetarily and non-monetarily, and thus gain true happiness.

As I have sought paths down which to proceed (or create), I have taken a number of personality and career tests and surveys.  I tend to be skeptical of the results as they rarely fully embody who I am.  It was with that attitude that I received the results of my Insights Analysis – yet, I have never had a more accurate synopsis of how I operate and communicate.  Due to my interpretation of its accuracy, I can actually learn about myself from my Insights profile and work to improve and become a better person and leader.

My Insights profile, lists my “Personal Position” as “Supporting Coordinator” (Insights Learning and Development).  I have often wondered if business is the best place for me to truly make a difference to people.  I enjoy making connections with people, deconstructing and understanding problems, and solving such problems.  My self-reflection did not end that night in April 2006 and clearly, I have chosen to pursue a path in business.  Through this path, I hope to blend my interests and skills and make a difference in the lives of my co-workers and the people affected by the organization in which I am employed.

I often seek out people in whom I see potential for leadership.  My “Supporting Coordinator” characteristics have been utilized in both professional and personal situations.  Four of my five years on staff at a Boy Scout summer camp were in the Business Manager position.  I missed the regular connection with the Scouts in camp that had enveloped my first year on staff so each week of the summer, I found a Scout with whom I would meet regularly to discuss the possibilities for learning and leadership that existed for him.  I might teach him about opportunities within the organization or give him advice on situations outside of Scouting.  Similarly, each summer I worked with one or more first year staff members to provide guidance, experience, and advice.  Each of these staff members subsequently ended up in manager or director positions.

In Good to Great and the Social Sectors, Jim Collins writes of his “Hedgehog Concept,” that your business must find the best of three circles: what you are deeply passionate about, what you can be the best in the world at, and what best drives your economic/resource engine (Collins).  I’d like to apply this concept to my leadership vision.  I will be someone who is passionate about what I do and who I am, who excels at tasks in which I use my talents, and who is resourceful and able to utilize my own resources to ensure success.

Yet, leadership is more than passion and hard work.  Leadership is about learning, applying, and implementing.  I do not think that I will ever be “the best leader”.  That is not said pessimistically; rather it is to imply that I may be “the best leader at any one time.”  My leadership is not a set goal or a science but a continual process that I will work to develop by learning from others and from myself.  I will seek to be the embodiment of best practices of leadership theory and leadership exercise.  Success will be gained not by some career or personal goal post being met, but by the recognition of others.  Throughout the Leading at the Edge Weekend, our group offered each member the ability to serve as a leader for a different activity.  Sometimes though, leadership occurred by offering an idea that the “leaders” or other group members had not thought of themselves.  The same scenario is true in business when lower-level employees offer ideas and advice to managers or when someone steps up while the rest of the group is struggling.

Leaders set the example.  I will be honest with myself and with others.  I will seek feedback and utilize this information for personal improvement.  Leaders are also dedicated and hard working.  I will be a servant leader utilizing a “deeper connection with [my] work” to find happiness and think beyond myself in my actions.  As such, I will embody James Autry’s “five ways of being”: authentic, vulnerable, accepting, present, and useful (Autry).  I will engage my weaknesses to transform them into strengths.  All of this is applicable and true in both personal and professional spheres.  As mentioned, I subscribe to the notion of a “whole person” (Grant).  In this case, the whole person means that who I am as a leader in business involves the same characteristics as my personal life – family, organizations, etc.

I will be remembered as someone who was knowledgeable and who cared, someone who always did his best.  I will not accept the status quo when the status quo can be improved.  In order to create progress and growth (personally and professionally), I will change the systems and frames in which we operate.  Are we asking the right questions?  Whether or not we are meeting a goal, is it the goal that we really need to meet?  By changing one’s frame of mind, it is possible to think creatively and lead others to do the same.

In addition to engaging my past experiences, I must understand where I currently am in my leadership development in order to achieve my vision.  After lengthy reflection, I believe that what follows are honest highlights of my strengths, limitations, opportunities, and threats.  Some of these characteristics have been informed by my Insights profile.

I love learning and seek professional and personal development.  I excel at understanding problems and breaking down the details to allow for effective solutions.  I work well in teams as well as by myself.  An understanding of others informs my decisions and I work to be fair and realistic in all of my interactions.  I smile, am optimistic, and keep my “feet firmly on the ground” (Insights Learning and Development).  I am organized and have excellent time management and multi-tasking skills.  Simultaneously, I sometimes get frustrated when I find the working methods of others to be unrealistic or when compromise is not seen as an option.  While I can establish great working relationships with others, I do not automatically trust others and rarely show all of my true emotions.  I sometimes seek structure more often than I should and may rely too heavily on rules or procedures.  Confidence in some of my ideas is sometimes lacking, even when I should be sharing them.

I am also a good administrator and can focus on task and people issues simultaneously.  My experiences have included business, non-profit, and higher education work.  I appreciate the importance of cultural understanding and I am often successful in shaping my worldview to be non-United States centric.  I will shortly have a master’s degree and I am often viewed as a safe and competent person to confide in or bounce ideas off of.  As I move into the world outside of education, I am well aware that my past experiences and skills are not all directly related to the fields in which I am seeking a professional position.  I have grown in the organizations in which I have been a part to be a recognized leader.  It may be a struggle to start at the bottom of the pyramid in new structures/organizations without being recognized, as I have been the past few years.  I sometimes like to have my own workspace or quiet space that may not exist in new work positions or new living situations.

I strongly believe that all of my limitations and threats can be transformed or overcome while I work to make use of my strengths and opportunities to become a better person and subsequently a better leader.  Most immediately, I am taking feedback from the Leading at the Edge weekend to become more confident in my ideas and actions and more willing to share them.  Additionally, I am joining new student organizations to learn about industries that interest me and in which I do not have professional experience.  Especially when my formal education ends, I will need to take proactive steps to ensure that I continue to develop the qualities necessary to achieve my leadership vision.

I am currently working on improving my communication of expectations for my working relationships.  I will ask specific questions during interviews to best understand the working environment and culture of potential employers.  In that I hope to have a job secured before graduation, I will continue to have similar conversations with class project teams and subsequently understanding and adjusting to the environment immediately upon starting a new job.  The effects of this new understand should be immediate and evident in my working discussions.

By the end of my first month of employment after graduation, I will seek out a mentorship with a leader in my new company.  Within whatever framework exists for such a program, I will position myself to best benefit from such a relationship.  If a mentorship program does not exist, I will approach the appropriate individual (in human resources or someone I would like to develop a relationship with directly) to create such an opportunity.  In the mentorship, I will work on understanding the company, my role and career path, and the structures and systems in place.  This will allow me to work with less restrictions (in terms of self-imposed limitations due to not understanding details of the company’s operating procedures) and progress through a career path more quickly.

During my first six months (and of course continuing into the future), I will work on developing close relationships with co-workers.  I will seek professional development opportunities to gain in depth job knowledge.  This combination will increase my comfort level with sharing new, potentially unconventional ideas and allow me to work with co-workers to support their goals.  In so doing, it is likely that I will receive reciprocal support and thus be able to become a leader in my team.  Within two to three years of progressive job experience and team support (depending on my starting position/company), I plan to achieve a promotion to a formal leadership position.

I will continuously push myself to learn and observe so that I can become a highly effective leader who supports others and myself in all that I do.  My leadership will constantly be developing and show up in who I am and how I am in both formal and informal relationships.

 

Bibliography

Autry, James A. The Servant Leader. New York: Random House, 2001.

Collins, Jim. Good to Great and the Social Sectors. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.

Friedman, Benjamin. The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2005.

Grant, Bob. Profiles in Leadership Joel Portman. 2 October 2010.

Insights Learning and Development. “Insights Discovery Personal Profile – Joel

Portman.” Dundee: Intergistic Solutions, 24 August 2010.

Order of the Arrow. OA History – Shawnee Lodge #51. 20 October 2010

<http://www.shawneelodge.org/History/oa/index.html&gt;.

Senge, Peter. The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learn. New York:

Doubleday, 1994.

 

Repost of the “Right Time”

I am finally making plans for my trip to Israel and England this Winter Break.  It is unlike me to have bought a plane ticket without solid plans, but I did so as to not pay double the price.  Now, I am in contact with friends to develop my plan.  I came across the following post on my Facebook profile.  I got home from studying abroad on December 26, 2008.  I wrote the post on December 28, 2008.  As I think about where I am going to be in Israel, this post certainly brings back memories.

I am hoping for a great trip, without the worries this post describes.  Hopefully, new memories will be made and I can rekindle old friendships.

Coming Home at the Right Time or the Wrong Time?

by Joel Portman on Sunday, December 28, 2008 at 12:51pm

I got home from Israel on December 26. On December 27 Israel launched a retaliatory operation against Hamas in the Gaza Strip for its rocket bombardments against Israeli citizens, including 80 rockets in one day. Hamas’ rockets can now reach Be’er Sheva, the city I was in.

Here is an email I got on the security situation from the Director of the Overseas Student Program at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev where I was studying:

Dear Students,
The semester is over and some of you have left Israel, others are still here for a while. As you probably have heard, a little more than 24 hours ago the Israeli Airforce began its bombardment of the Gaza strip. This is the first phase of a military operation that is intended to restore normalcy to the Jewish towns that are adjacent to the Gaza Strip. As I write this, casualties on the Palestinian side are upwards of 230, the vast majority of which are men in uniform. On the Israeli side there has been one casualty in Netivot and 4 injured there. There is no indication at this time as to the extent of this operation. The range of Hamas rocket attacks have expanded their range to include areas that have previously been unaffected: Towns of Ashkelon, Ashdod, Kiryat Gat, Rahat and as of this morning Beer-Sheva too, are now in the Home Front Command “at risk” category. This is not a cause for extra or new alarm, but for those of you who are still in Israel it requires the following awareness and know-how: If you can plan to be elsewhere in the country for the upcoming week (Jerusalem, Tel-Aviv or their suburbs) it is advised. If you are in Beer-Sheva or any of the other abovementioned towns and you hear a waving siren or a “code red” (“Tzeva Adom”) or big explosion search out and enter the nearest designated sheltered area (a “miklat” or “mamad” or “ezor mugan”). Most likely everyone around you will be hurrying to these locations. In their absence, go to internal rooms with fewer windows or staircases. Do not stay in a bathroom when a siren is heard. After five minutes it is permitted to leave the protective areas if no other instructions were given. To those of you who are still here I suggest all to get familiar with the instructions posted (in English) in the Home Front Command website at: http://www.oref.org.il/934-en/PAKAR.aspx There is good reason to be alert and informed, but there is absolutely NO reason to get anxious or panicky. If you are still here you have noticed that the Israelis around you are calm and they stick to their daily routines.

I urge you all to contact your parents and maintain in regular contact with them as they most likely are being informed by international news agencies (CNN and the like) which tend to paint a disproportionately dire picture of Israeli reality at times like these.
Feel free to contact me, Tzipi, Hila or Inbal with any question you may have.

All the best,
Shlomo

If you are interested in updates in what is going on, check out:
www.ynetnews.com
www.jpost.com

 

Brooke Depenbusch

Hmmmmmmmmmm

December 28, 2008 at 1:03pm
  • Kerrie M. Rueda

    Just glad you’re safe and sound. Looking forward to hearing about your amazing time in Israel.

    December 28, 2008 at 1:32pm
    Miles Brennan
    For the sake of science we need to test the association between your presence and peace in the Middle East: Accordingly, fly back to Israel, and see if the shooting stops
    December 28, 2008 at 4:12pm
    Tabi Southall
    Glad you’re safe Joel
  • December 28, 2008 at 6:17pm
    Barney Katzerman
    im at the airport now. Nitay and I went to the old city, apparently there were riots going on while we were there and didnt know it.  Glad to see your home. its really not as bad as it sounds, but a lot of ppl dont want their kids in uniform…
    December 28, 2008 at 6:45pm
  • Tess Cromer

    Wow, that’s intense…I’m so glad you are safely home.

    December 29, 2008 at 11:32pm
  • Midterm Elections / Quote #20

    Think about this when considering the next leader you will vote for (if the possibility even exists today):

    “He who follows such a pathway in unwavering cheerful service will be seen by many others and, by inspiration, lead them.” – Allowat Sakima