Sarah Palin’s Responsibility for the Term “Blood Libel”

Sarah Palin recently released a video reaction to the shooting targeting Gabrielle Giffords.  I actually thought she had a number of good points in her video and appreciate most of the sentiment.  However, Palin’s use of the term “blood libel” is shocking and offensive.  One can only hope that if she understand the history of the term and how relevant it is to Congresswoman Giffords that she would have chosen another way to represent her thoughts.  If she meant what she said, I really do have some concern.

I encourage you to watch Sarah Palin’s video.

Afterwards, I encourage you to think about the following:

  1. Why did Sarah Palin release such a video?  What was her motive?
  2. Did she mean “blood libel” as has been interpreted?
  3. Importantly for the recent situation: Are law breakers singularly responsible for what happens?  Are we not all influenced by our environments and communities?
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More Discrimination Protection in Missouri State Goverment

The following is an article by Virginia Young from STLtoday.com:

JEFFERSON CITY — A group representing gays and lesbians is celebrating a declaration by Gov. Jay Nixon that says state government shouldn’t discriminate against its employees based on their sexual orientation.

Though the statement has no force of law, it establishes a clear policy for the executive branch and is a “major stepping stone to achieving a statewide” anti-discrimination law, said A.J. Bockelman, executive director of the gay rights group known as PROMO.

Nixon buried the nugget of news in an executive order he issued earlier this month at a convention of the NAACP.

State law already bars employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, ancestry, age, and disability. Nixon’s order added sexual orientation and veteran status to the list of protected categories for state workers.

The order called for the state to treat its employees equally in regard to hiring, recruiting, training, benefits, promotions, transfers, layoffs, demotions, terminations, rate of compensation, and recalls from layoffs.

Equal treatment also should apply in the way state services and facilities operate, the order says.

Scott Holste, a spokesman for Nixon, said the move “was not aimed at any particular group. It sends a message that Missouri will not discriminate in any of these categories.”

Nixon hasn’t always drawn praise from gays and lesbians. Some were irked in 2008 when, as Missouri’s attorney general, he urged delay of a California court ruling allowing same-sex marriages.